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Hot Work Permit Guidelines

How Does the Hot Work Permit System Work?

Before a contractor or Bedrock team member can perform Hot Work in an occupied building, they will be required to obtain a valid Hot Work Permit. In order to obtain a Hot Work Permit, contractors must coordinate with their project manager to meet with the Bedrock Property Manager (or Assistant Property Manager) for authorization. The Bedrock Property Manager (or Assistant Property Manager) will issue the permit to the contractor. The permit will be valid for a specified time period. The contractor may then perform the hot work, following the precautions outlined on the permit. After the Hot Work is completed, the contractor turns the permit over to the Bedrock Property Manager (or Assistant Property Manager).

When is a Hot Work Permit Necessary?

Hot Work permits are needed whenever any cutting, welding, soldering and brazing is needed to be performed for construction/demolition/maintenance/repair activities that involve the use of portable gas, arc welding equipment, die or angle grinders, or any equipment that will generate any amount of sparks capable of creating a fire hazard.

Where is a Hot Work Permit Necessary?

Hot Work Permits are needed for each location where Hot Work will be performed (utility tunnels are considered to be separate buildings). For example, if one contractor is performing work at several different buildings for one project, a permit is necessary for each building.

Who Needs Hot Work Permits?

Hot Work Permits are needed for each and every contractor or sub-contractor/trades or Bedrock engineering/maintenance team member performing Hot Work in an occupied building. For example, if there are three different sub-contractors/trades performing Hot Work on one project, each sub-contractor/trade is responsible for obtaining a permit for their own work.

Who Issues The Hot Work Permit?

The Bedrock Property Manager (or Assistant Property Manager) issues Hot Work Permits.

How Long Is A Hot Work Permit Valid?

The duration of a Hot Work Permit depends upon the type of project (new or existing construction) and the type of the Hot Work to be performed. The Bedrock Property Manager (or Assistant Property Manager) will use the following guidelines to determine the time limit for each permit issued.

NOTE – These are guidelines only and are subject to alteration by the Bedrock Property Manager.

+ Bedrock Engineering/Maintenance will be issued permits on 7-day intervals.
+ Contractors involved in renovation and/remodeling of existing occupied buildings, will be issued permits valid for 1-day only.

Should The Hot Work Permit Be Posted?

Hot Work Permits do not need to be posted at the job site but should be accessible and available upon request by the Bedrock Property Manager (or designee) or any authorized representative of Bedrock Real Estate Services.

Who Checks To See If the Hot Work Requirements Are Met?

The contractor or sub-contractor/trade performing Hot Work is ultimately responsible for conducting their Hot Work activities in a sound, fire-safe manner and following the precautions outlined on the Hot Work permit. However the Bedrock Property Manager (or designee) may periodically check the work and job site to verify that the contractor is carrying out the requirements of the Hot Work permit.

After the Hot Work is Complete … Then What?

Once a Hot Work permit has been filled or when the Hot Work has been completed, the contractor shall return the completed Hot Work permit to the Bedrock Property Management Office, whereby it will be kept on file.

What happens if I don’t get a Hot Work Permit?

In the event an individual does not notify the Bedrock Property Manager to apply for a Hot Work Permit and are found conducting work that meets the above stated criteria, they will be subject to possible disciplinary action, up to and including termination of employment/contract, dismissal from job site, as well as financial responsibilities for any/all fire alarm fees, and/or lost production/operational revenues incurred in the event of a building evacuation.